Social Cluster Members 2017-11-30T17:03:21+00:00

Researchers

Social Integration, Rights, Culture and Security

35 Members
Approved
Amanda Sim

Doctoral Candidate
Department of Social Policy and Intervention
University of Oxford

Biography::

Amanda Sim is a doctoral candidate in Social Intervention at the University of Oxford. Her research is on the development, implementation and evaluation of family-based interventions to reduce violence and promote mental health and resilience among children and families affected by war. Her doctoral research is a mixed methods study on the inter-generational impact of war among Syrian refugee families in Lebanon.

Amanda previously worked at the International Rescue Committee, where she conducted research on the causes and effects of violence against women and children, and the effectiveness of parenting and mental health interventions in humanitarian settings. She has over ten years of experience in research and programme implementation and evaluation in Uganda, Afghanistan, Liberia, Ethiopia, Lebanon, and the Thai-Burmese border. Amanda holds a MA in International Development from Tufts University and a BA in Psychology and Romance Languages from New York University.

Approved
Amarnath Amarasingam

Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Strategic Dialogue

Biography::

Amarnath Amarasingam, PhD, is a Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Strategic Dialogue, and co-directs a study of Western foreign fighters based at the University of Waterloo. He is the author of Pain, Pride, and Politics: Sri Lankan Tamil Activism in Canada (2015). His research interests are in radicalization, terrorism, diaspora politics, post-war reconstruction, and the sociology of religion. He is the editor of Sri Lanka: The Struggle for Peace in the Aftermath of War (2016), The Stewart/Colbert Effect: Essays on the Real Impacts of Fake News (2011) and Religion and the New Atheism: A Critical Appraisal (2010). He is also the author of several peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, has presented papers at over 100 national and international conferences, and has written for The New York Times, The Monkey Cage, The Atlantic, Foreign Affairs, and War on the Rocks. He tweets at @AmarAmarasingam

Approved
April Mandrona

Assistant Professor, Nova Scotia College of Art and Design

Biography::

Dr. Mandrona received her doctorate in Art Education from Concordia and was a SSHRC postdoctoral fellow at McGill. She has published articles and book chapters on young people’s visual culture, rurality, ethics, and participatory visual research. She recently guest edited a Special Issue of Girlhood Studies. Her co-edited volume, Visual Encounters in the Study of Rural Childhoods (Rutgers) will be released in Spring 2018. Mandrona's research with young people focuses on the social roles of artistic production, rurality, ethical practice, and youth participation. She recently received a SSHRC Insight Development Grant to explore the creation of picturebooks with refugee children living in Halifax and England. This work aims to address ongoing issues of racism and xenophobia directed at newcomers in Atlantic Canada and beyond.

Approved
Bayan Khatib

Co-Founder of Syrian Canadian Foundation

Biography::

Bayan Khatib, is the Co-founder and Director of The Syrian Canadian Foundation. For the past five years, Bayan lead a multinational media campaign, had numerous media appearances, and participated as a speaker on the Syrian crisis at local and international events. Bayan is the translator of Just Five Minutes: Nine Years in the Prisons of Syria, a memoir of a female political prisoner, and is also the author of numerous short works of fiction and opinion articles.

Approved
Bayan Khatib

Executive Director of the Syrian Canadian Foundation

Biography::

Bayan Khatib is a published creative and non-fiction writer and a speaker about human rights and the Syrian refugee crisis. She is the co-founder and director of the Syrian Canadian Foundation and on the advisory committees of a number of nonprofits and community groups.

Bayan graduated from the University of Toronto, Mississauga, with a degree in English and Professional Writing and Communications and also has a Masters in Cultural Studies and Critical Theory from McMaster University.

Approved
Bonita Varga

Mental Health Commission of Canada

Biography::

Knowledge Broker with the Mental Health Commission of Canada with a specialization in the mental health of immigrant, refugee, ethno-cultural and racialized populations, family caregivers and collaborative mental health care.

Approved
Catherine Panter-Brick

Professor of Anthropology at Yale University.

Biography::

Catherine Panter-Brick, MA, MSc, D.Phil, is a medical anthropologist, trained in human biology and the social sciences.

She directs the Program on Conflict, Resilience, and Health at the MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies, and the AnthropologyProgram on Stress and Family Resilience. She is also the Senior Editor (Medical Anthropology) of the interdisciplinary journal Social Science & Medicine. Panter-Brick holds a joint appointment in the Department of Anthropology and the Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, and a secondary appointment at the School of Public Health. She actively serves on the Steering Committee of the Yale Women’s Faculty Forum (WFF) and the Global Health Initiative (GHI). Prior to coming to Yale, she was a Professor of Anthropology at Durham University and a Fellow at St Hugh’s College, Oxford University.

Her current research focuses on youth in global adversity, addressing issues of risk and resilience in contexts of poverty, disease, famine, armed conflict, and social marginalization. She has directed over 40 interdisciplinary research and evaluation projects in Afghanistan, Ethiopia, the Gambia, Jordan, Nepal, Niger, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Tanzania, and the United Kingdom. Her teaching at Yale includes interdisciplinary courses on global health, equity, and mental health, and seminar classes on violence, resilience, and humanitarian interventions.

Approved
Catherine Bryan

Dalhousie University
School of Social Work,
Assistant Professor

Biography::

Catherine Bryan is a social anthropologist and assistant professor at Dalhousie University's School of Social Work. She has an BSW and MSW from McGill, where her MSW thesis explored the experiences of flight and resettlement for unaccompanied and separated refugee children in Canada. Her PhD work, completed at Dalhousie, was a multi-sited ethnography detailing the production and reproduction of a small Filipino working class in rural Manitoba. Her work offers insight into the long-arm of capitalist political economy and the experiences and consequences of transnational projects of livelihood.

Approved
Delphine Collin-Vezina

Licensed clinical psychologist, Tier II Canada Research Chair in Child Welfare, Associate Professor at the McGill School of Social Work.

Biography::

Delphine Collin-Vezinalicensed is a clinical psychologist, Tier II Canada Research Chair in Child Welfare, Associate Professor in the McGill School of Social Work and recently appointed the Nicolas Steinmetz and Gilles Julien Chair in Social Pediatrics in the Department of Pediatrics. She has a strong interest in research and clinical topics related to child maltreatment, child sexual abuse, and trauma.

She has been the principal investigator of several substantial provincial and federal grants, including Insight Grant from SSHRC, and Programme des actions concertées from the Fonds Québécois de Recherche(FQR). She has led and collaborated on significant projects on mental health, family violence and service provision with key organizations in Québec, including the Ministry of Health and Social Services, and the First Nations of Québec and Labrador Health and Social Services Commission (FNQLHSSC).

Her research has contributed to an understanding of epidemiological trends in child sexual abuse, of child protection responses to reports of child sexual abuse cases, of trauma-related needs of children and adolescents from different health and social services settings (e.g. youths in out-of-home care), and of trauma-related service provision in child protection agencies and health.

She has also been a co-investigator on numerous projects and on team networks funded through CIHR, SSHRC, and FQR that cover a wide range of topics including child mental health, family dynamics, childhood ethics, and intervention programs.

Approved
Emily Truong-Cheung

Student, University of British Columbia

Biography::

I'm interested in exploring internet use amongst refugee youths. The Internet has become embedded in the daily lives of much of the developed world (DiMaggio et al., 2001; Howard, Rainie & Jones, 2002; Wellman & Haythornthwaite, 2002). For refugee migrants, connectivity can be vital to maintaining family connections, staying informed and secure, supporting economic self-sufficiency, and educating themselves (Mikal and Woodfield 2015). Refugees migrants’ online participation presents a unique opportunity to examine the internet activities and refugee migrants’ resettlement process. I examine how refugee migrants’ internet participation affects their feeling of belongingness and social integration to new society.

Approved
Evangelia TASTSOGLOU

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY, SAINT MARY'S UNIVERSITY
COORDINATOR, INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT STUDIES, SAINT MARY'S UNIVERSITY

Biography::

Evangelia Tastsoglou, LLM, PhD, is Professor of Sociology and Coordinator of the International Development Studies Program at Saint Mary’s University in Halifax, Nova Scotia. She is also a member of the Executive of the International Sociological Association (2014-2018) and has been a board member of the Canadian Ethnic Studies Association since 2001.  My research, published in national and international peer-reviewed venues, engages feminist and intersectional perspectives on women, gender and various aspects of international migration; Canadian immigration and integration; violence and migration; citizenship and belonging; transnationalism and diasporas. My most recent volume is Interrogating Gender, Violence, and the State in National and Transnational Contexts, in Current Sociology Monograph Series (Vol. 64:4, 2016, co-edited with Margaret Abraham). I have served as president of RC 32 (the Research Committee on Women in Society) of the ISA (2010-2014) and chairperson of the Department of Sociology and Criminology at Saint Mary’s University (2006-2012).

Approved
Ghayda Hassan

Clinical psychologist and professor of clinical psychology at UQAM university.

Biography::

Dr. Ghayda Hassan is a clinical psychologist and professor of clinical psychology at UQAM university in Montreal and has several research, clinical and community based national and international affiliations. Her systematic reviews, research and clinical activities are centred around four main areas of clinical cultural psychology: 1) Intervention in family violence & cultural diversity; 2)Identity, belonging and mental health of children and adolescents from ethnic/religious minorities ; 3) Cohabitation, intercommunity relations and violent extremism ; 4) working with vulnerable immigrants and refugees.

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