Economic Cluster Members 2017-11-30T17:00:28+00:00

Researchers

Broader Economic, Social and Political Factors

22 Members
Approved
Abdie Kazemipur

Professor of Sociology and Chair of Ethnic Studies at the University of Calgary

Biography::

Dr. Abdie Kazemipur is currently professor of sociology and the Chair of Ethnic Studies at the University of Calgary. Originally from Iran, he came to Winnipeg in 1993 to do his PhD in sociology at the University of Manitoba. In 2012-13, he served as Stephen Jarislowsly Chair in Culture Change and Immigration at Memorial University of Newfoundland, where he conducted research on issues related to retention and integration of immigrants. He has also been the founding academic director of two Statistics Canada Research Data Centres at University of Lethbridge and Memorial University. His research is in two distinct areas: the socio-economic experiences of immigrants in Canada, and the socio-cultural developments in the Middle East, on which he has published eight books, in English and Farsi; he is currently working on a new manuscript titled Sacred as Secular: Secularization under Theocracy in Iran. Dr. Kazemipur’s works have been recognized through many awards, including the 2015 John Porter Award by Canadian Sociological Association and the 2018 Researcher Award by the Canadian National Metropolis.

Approved
Amal Madibbo

Associate Professor, Department of Sociology at the University of Calgary.

Biography::

Amal Madibbo is an associate professor at the Department of Sociology at the University of Calgary. Her areas of expertise include qualitative social research, social exclusion, sociological theory and more.

Approved
Amanda Sim

Doctoral Candidate
Department of Social Policy and Intervention
University of Oxford

Biography::

Amanda Sim is a doctoral candidate in Social Intervention at the University of Oxford. Her research is on the development, implementation and evaluation of family-based interventions to reduce violence and promote mental health and resilience among children and families affected by war. Her doctoral research is a mixed methods study on the inter-generational impact of war among Syrian refugee families in Lebanon.

Amanda previously worked at the International Rescue Committee, where she conducted research on the causes and effects of violence against women and children, and the effectiveness of parenting and mental health interventions in humanitarian settings. She has over ten years of experience in research and programme implementation and evaluation in Uganda, Afghanistan, Liberia, Ethiopia, Lebanon, and the Thai-Burmese border. Amanda holds a MA in International Development from Tufts University and a BA in Psychology and Romance Languages from New York University.

Approved
Anne Kim

Associate Professor at York University

Biography::

Ann H. Kim is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at York University in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

She joined York as an assistant professor in 2006 after completing her doctorate in Sociology at Brown University in 2005, where she was also a Population Studies and Training Center (PSTC) trainee, and after working as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Toronto. She holds an Honours BA (with high distinction) and an MSW from the University of Toronto. Before pursuing doctoral studies, Ann spent several years in the non-profit sector, working internationally -- Toronto, Ottawa, Sydney (Australia) and London (UK).

Approved
Daniella Bagmeijer

Research and Policy Officer at AAISA

Biography::

Daniella Bagmeijer is the Research and Policy Officer at the Alberta Association of Immigrant Serving Agencies (AAISA), a regionally and nationally recognized leader in the settlement and integration sector. Originally from the Netherlands, Daniella completed her Bachelor’s Degree at Mount Royal University, and returned to Maastricht for graduate school. She graduated with a double Master’s of Science in Public Policy and Human Development through a joint program specializing in Social Protection Policy from both Maastricht University and the United Nations University. As an immigrant to both Colombia and Canada, Daniella is passionate of the work that AAISA does representing immigrant-serving agencies and organizations that work with newcomers across the province. In addition to immigration policy, Daniella is also interested in social justice, equality, and access to healthcare.

Approved
Dominique Clement

Associate Professor at University of Alberta

Biography::

My scholarship is concerned with social and political change in Canada and the ability of marginalized people to challenge state power as well as the hegemony of law. In particular, I am interested in the impact of rights discourse on social movements. My most recent research projects include a study of human rights law in Canada as well as a project that explores how our rights culture has evolved in Canadian history. I am the principal investigator for a team of five scholars across Canada who are part of a five-year (2014-19) study that examines the history and impact of state funding for social movements in Canada and how the relationship between the funding and the movements differs across movements, regions, and time periods. I am also working on projects that deal with national security policies and counterterrorism; security and the Olympics; feminism and the history of the women's movement in Canada; freedom of information policy; and civilian review of police misconduct.

Approved
Elke Winter

Associate Professor at University of Ottawa

Biography::

I am interested in issues of migration, ethnicity, multiculturalism, and national identity in Canada/Québec and Europe. I have published on historical sociology, namely on the idea of “race” in early German sociology and on Max Weber's contribution to the sociology of ethnic relations. My most recent book (UTP, 2011) studies the intersection between nationalism and multiculturalism. In particular, it traces the triangular relations between the national majority, established minorities, and immigration-related diversity in Canada. See elkewinter.com for an overview of my current research projects. I supervise graduate students with research projects in the fields of nationalism, migration, asylum/integration, and interethnic diversity.

Approved
Fernando Mata

Professor at University of Ottawa, School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies

Biography::

Fernando Mata is a social demographer who obtained his doctorate in ethnic studies at York University (Toronto, Canada). In the last thirty years, he worked for various Canadian federal government departments such as Canadian Heritage, Citizenship and Immigration Canada, Human Resources and Social Development and Justice Canada. He has several publications in Canadian and international journals and books in topics related to social demography, multiculturalism, ethnic and race relations as well as social statistics& methodology. He taught undergraduate and graduate courses in social demography and statistics for the Departments of Social Science at Royal Roads University (Victoria, Canada), School of Journalism and Communications at Carleton University and the School of Sociological and Anthropological Studies at the University of Ottawa (Ottawa, Canada). As a member of the Canadian Population Society he is interested in projects related to the well-being of visible, ethnic minorities and religious groups in Canada and the world.

Approved
Ian Van Haren

PhD Student, McGill University

Biography::

Ian Van Haren is a PhD student at McGill University. He is currently a research assistant on the Early Integration Trajectories of Syrian Refugees in Canada project funded by SSHRC.

Approved
Ismaël Traoré

Research and Information Coordinator, AMSSA

Biography::

Ismaël Traoré is the Research and Information Coordinator at AMSSA, the umbrella association of immigrant and refugee settlement support services in British Columbia. At AMSSA, he is responsible for content curation and knowledge mobilization. He manages a research database on settlement sector and immigrant and newcomer relevant information and seeks community-based participatory research opportunities. Dr. Traoré holds a PhD in Sociology with a specialization in social inequality and has taught at UBC, McMaster University, and Okanagan College. He is interested in justice and equality and collaborative partnerships between academic researchers, social service organizations and the government sector.

Approved
Jack Jedwab

Executive Vice-President of the Association for Canadian Studies and the Canadian Institute for Identities and Migration.

Biography::

Jack is the Executive Vice-President of the Association for Canadian Studies and the Canadian Institute for Identities and Migration. Holding a Ph.D. in Canadian History from Concordia University, he taught at Université du Québec à Montréal and McGill University. He taught courses on the history of immigration in Quebec, on ethnic minorities in Quebec, on official language minorities in Canada and on sport in Canada. He also wrote essays for books, journals and newspapers across the country, in addition to being the author of various publications and government reports on issues of immigration, multiculturalism, human rights and official languages.

Approved
Jill Bucklaschuk

SSHRC Postdoctoral Fellow (University of Guelph) and Community-based Researcher

Biography::

Jill Bucklaschuk is a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada postdoctoral fellow at the University of Guelph in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology. She obtained her doctorate in Sociology from the University of Manitoba where she completed a dissertation on lower skilled temporary migration in Manitoba. Based on years of community-based research experience, her work uses qualitative research methods to examine how non-permanent legal status impacts the social and workplace experiences of temporary migrants as they negotiate settlement in Canada.

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